☆Cassoulet☆ A rich stew of beans, pork and duck. From the Languedoc region of S…

☆Cassoulet☆

A rich stew of beans, pork and duck. From the Languedoc region of South West France, more specifically the towns of Toulouse, Castelnaudary and Carcassonne. To give a definitive recipe is largely a futile exercise, for there are as many versions as there are cooks. Beans, pork, sausages and confit duck or goose are however non negotiable. Lamb may appear in Toulouse offerings, possibly partridge in Carcassonne. This is more akin to a Castelnaudary cassoulet, albeit entirely inauthentic. It’s virtually impossible to buy the requisite salt pork, my butcher didn’t have Toulouse sausages (despite promising me some) the duck was confited in vegetable oil, not the snowy white duck fat, purely out of economy, buying enough fat to preserve the duck costs more than the legs themselves. The beans used are cannellini, for some reason dried haricot are always so small, the lingots beans from Castelnaudary are so much bigger and not easily sourced. Inspite all of this, a very good version is easily achieved. Browned pieces of pork belly, softened onion, lots of garlic and herbs along with previously soaked beans baked gently until tender, about an hour. The only other flavour I add is tomato purée, sometimes frowned upon, but the slight acidity cuts through the richness in a pleasantly subtle way. In the final part of cooking the confit and sausages are tucked in, cooked at a higher heat to encourage the formation of a crust, legend suggests stirring the pot seven times to create the chapelure or crust, something I’ve not yet achieved. Whether you use breadcrumbs or not is another hotly debated discussion of cassoulet. Enough of my pontificating, this classic French dish for this weeks is delicious as it is unphotogenic. One word of warning, do not plan on doing anything strenuous after eating. Served with a glass of /> .
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21 thoughts on “☆Cassoulet☆ A rich stew of beans, pork and duck. From the Languedoc region of S…

  1. Would love you to contribute this amazing recipe (you can cut and paste), or any of your others, to Reciprocal Recipes’ website. Reciprocal is a global community of home cooks who upload their recipes to help preserve our valuable food heritage, share them with others and keep them safe. You can link to your Instagram page and blog if you have one. Link in bio! Just click join (all free) then contribute!

  2. That looks gorgeous Laurie , description aside even just looking at it you’d know it was absolutely delicious

  3. Would love you to contribute this amazing recipe (you can cut and paste), or any of your others, to Reciprocal Recipes’ website. Reciprocal is a global community of home cooks who upload their recipes to help preserve our valuable food heritage, share them with others and keep them safe. You can link to your Instagram page and blog if you have one. Link in bio! Just click join (all free) then contribute!

  4. Oh wow! Laurie this is the definitive dish of January. The dish that restores, revives and warms us through. Stunning! I wish I could join you. ️

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